What are the major concepts I employ that are unique to my professional practice?
June 26, 2020
Walden NURS6521 Week 5 Quiz Latest 2017
June 26, 2020

Discussion: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual

Settings

Whether used with individuals or families, the goal of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is to modify client behavior. Although CBT for families is similar to CBT for individuals, there are significant differences in their applications. As you develop treatment plans, it is important that you recognize these differences and how they may impact your therapeutic approach with families. For this Discussion, as you compare the use of CBT for families and individuals, consider challenges of applying this therapeutic approach to your own client families.

To prepare:

· Review the media, Johnson Family Session 3, in this week’s Learning Resources

and consider the insights provided on CBT in family therapy.

· Reflect on your practicum experiences with CBT in family and individual settings.

N: B. The video for Johnson Family Episode 3 Program Transcript is ATTACHED

WITH THIS ASSIGNMENT INCASE YOU CAN NOT ACCESS THE VIDEO.

ASSIGNMENT

Post an explanation of how the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in families compares to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in individual settings. Provide specific examples from your own practicum experiences. Then, explain challenges counselors might encounter when using CBT in the family setting. Support your position with specific examples from this week’s media.

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

Chapter 12, “Family Therapy” (Review pp. 429–468.)

Nichols, M. (2014). The essentials of family therapy (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Chapter 10, “Cognitive-Behavior Family Therapy” (pp. 166–189)

Chapter 12, “Solution-Focused Therapy” (pp. 225–242)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Bond, C., Woods, K., Humphrey, N., Symes, W., & Green, L. (2013). Practitioner review: The effectiveness of solution focused brief therapy with children and families: A systematic and critical evaluation of the literature from 1990–2010. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54(7), 707–723. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12058

Conoley, C., Graham, J., Neu, T., Craig, M., O’Pry, A., Cardin, S., & … Parker, R. (2003). Solution-focused family therapy with three aggressive and oppositional-acting children: An N=1 empirical study. Family Process, 42(3), 361–374. doi:10.1111/j.1545-5300.2003.00361.x

de Castro, S., & Guterman, J. (2008). Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 34(1), 93–106. doi:10.111/j.1752-0606.2008.00055.x

Patterson, T. (2014). A cognitive behavioral systems approach to family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 132–144. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.910023

Perry, A. (2014). Cognitive behavioral therapy with couples and families. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 29(3), 366–367. doi:10.1080/14681994.2014.909024

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481–495. doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

Washington, K. T., Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Oliver, D. P., Baldwin, P. K., Tappana, J., Wright, J. H., & Demiris, G. (2014). Rethinking family caregiving: Tailoring cognitive-behavioral therapies to the hospice experience. Health & Social Work, 39(4), 244–250. doi:10.1093/hsw/hlu031

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013c). Johnson family session 3 [Video file]. Author: Baltimore, MD.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

Johnson Family Episode 3

Johnson Family Episode 3 Program Transcript

[PEOPLE SOCIALIZING AT PARTY]

MALE SPEAKER: Hey there. How you feeling?

FEMALE SPEAKER: I’m drunk.

MALE SPEAKER: Yes, you are. Here, have some more.

FEMALE SPEAKER: I need to lay down. I don’t feel so good.

MALE SPEAKER: No, no, no, no. Not here. Not here.

FEMALE SPEAKER: Take me home.

MALE SPEAKER: I can’t leave. It’s my frat party. I actually– But I’ll tell you what, let me take you upstairs. You can use my bed. OK?

FEMALE SPEAKER: Sure.

MALE SPEAKER: All right. Come on, Talia. I got you.

FEMALE SPEAKER: I remember him lying me down on a bed and then he started kissing me. I think I kissed him back. And then he started taking off my pants. I told him to stop, but I must have passed out. When I woke up later, I didn’t have anything on. I just grabbed my clothes and got the hell out of there.

I feel like such a fool. I had too much to drink. I don’t know why I let it happen.

FEMALE SPEAKER: Thank you for sharing. It sounds like you still feel responsible for what happened. Has anyone else had similar feelings about something that’s happened to them?

FEMALE SPEAKER: There was this guy once, I told him no just like you. I told him really loud, but it didn’t matter. He did what he wanted anyway. He raped me. And for some reason, I blamed myself for it. It took a long time and a lot of help to realize I was wrong. It wasn’t my fault. Just like it’s not your fault. That frat boy, he’s the one to blame.

FEMALE SPEAKER: When it happened to me some of the people in my life, people I loved, they said it was my fault. Said that I shouldn’t have been where I was. Said it wouldn’t have happened otherwise. But it wasn’t my fault. It wasn’t. But to have people that you trust say those things about you, it’s confusing. It hurts.

© 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1

Johnson Family Episode 3

FEMALE SPEAKER: Thank you for sharing your thoughts and being supportive. It’s important in a group like this.

FEMALE SPEAKER: Is it? Is it really? I’m not so sure. It hurts talking about it like this. It just, it keeps hurting.

Johnson Family Episode 3 Additional Content Attribution

MUSIC: Music by Clean Cuts

Original Art and Photography Provided By: Brian Kline and Nico Danks

© 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 2

 

“Looking for a Similar Assignment? Get Expert Help at an Amazing Discount!”

The post Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual appeared first on Custom Nursing Help.

 

"Is this question part of your assignment? We Can Help!"

Essay Writing Service